Dr. Sean R. Notley, PhD

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Dr. Sean Notley is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow within the Human and Environmental Physiology Research Unit (HEPRU) at the University of Ottawa, Canada. Before arriving at HEPRU, Sean completed graduate training in the areas of work and thermal physiology at the University of Wollongong, Australia. His current research focuses on understanding the inter- and intra-individual factors that modulate human thermoregulatory function during heat stress.  To date, Sean has published a combined total of >70 full-length manuscripts, book chapters, technical reports, conference abstracts and non-scientific publications (blog and magazine articles). Sean has received >$1 million in research funding and presented his work at five invited symposia at national / international scientific meetings.  He is currently a reviewer for nine  publications in Physiology including Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Journal of Applied Physiology, among others, and serves as a social media ambassador for the European Journal of Applied Physiology

Dr. Gregory W. McGarr, PhD

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 Dr. Gregory McGarr is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow with the Human and Environmental Physiology Research Unit at the University of Ottawa, ON, Canada. He completed his Masters degree in Medical Biophysics at the University of Western Ontario in London, ON, Canada. There he conducted studies in rodents examining inflammation and microcirculatory responses in skeletal muscle and liver following hind-limb compartment syndrome. He also gained clinical research experience at London Health Sciences Centre studying the microcirculatory responses of cardiac surgical patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting and valve repair. Greg then completed his PhD in Applied Health Sciences at Brock University in St. Catharines, ON, Canada. His doctoral thesis examined the role of sensory nerves in mediating cutaneous microvascular reactivity in the human forearm following ischaemia-reperfusion injury. During this time he was also involved in several laboratory and field-based research projects examining cardiorespiratory, immune, metabolic, and thermoregulatory responses to heat and cold stress in humans. His current research focus is the pharmacology and physiology of skin blood flow and sweating in healthy and clinical populations.

Dr. Ashley AKERMAN, PHD

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 Dr. Ashley Akerman is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the Human and Environmental Physiology Research Unit (HEPRU) at the University of Ottawa, Canada. Ashley previously completed his undergraduate training in Cardiovascular Exercise Physiology at Liverpool John Moores University (UK) before completing graduate training in Exercise and Environmental Physiology at the University of Otago (New Zealand). His recent research has focused on understanding acute and chronic responses to synergistic, inter-related stressors – such as exercise, heat, and hydration - and their impact on healthy individuals (e.g., adaptation for sport performance) and individuals with chronic diseases (particularly cardiovascular and metabolic disease). He is currently investigating integrative physiological responses to stress in vulnerable populations, and factors that exacerbate and mitigate these outcomes.

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aakerman@uottawa.ca

613-562-5800 ext. 1899

Dr. JEREMY McCORMICK, PHD

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 Dr. James Jeremy McCormick is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow within the Human and Environmental Physiology Research Unit (HEPRU) at the University of Ottawa, Canada. Jeremy completed his graduate work in Exercise Physiology at the University of New Mexico Department of Health, Exercise, and Sports Science where he studied physiological responses to exercise and various dietary supplemental interventions during heat and hypoxic exposure. He also gained experience in techniques in molecular biology working with the University of New Mexico Department of Internal Medicine studying cellular stress responses in the elderly and people with chronic disease. Jeremy’s doctoral thesis examined the cellular mechanisms of autophagy and heat shock proteins in prediabetic individuals in response to exercise and simulated cellular starvation. His current research focus is the cellular stress response mechanisms to heat exposure in vulnerable populations. 

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jmccorm3@uottawa.ca

613-562-5800 ext. 1112